TPP death pool: more pharmaceutical destruction is coming

‘After any agreement is achieved between high-level criminals, there are two basic phases. First, conflicts arise, and the settlements are crude and sometimes painful. Second, the criminal parties realize, like the ‘gentlemen’ they are, that the jackpot they are sharing is big enough for everyone. So they unify their stance. They focus in on their real target: the public.’ -The Underground, Jon Rappoport
Question: ‘Who said that drug was safe? Where did that assessment come from? People are dropping like flies.’
Answer: ‘We all said it was safe. Remember? All twelve members of the TPP. We all agreed. So now we have to stick to our guns. Admit nothing. Keep your mouth shut.’
This ‘trade treaty,’ the TPP, will, if passed, eventually morph into a close-knit international collective of government agencies that collaborate on medical-drug ‘safety.’
Translation: the US FDA and Health Canada, and the Australian TGA, and the New Zealand MEDSAFE, and the medical regulatory agencies of Singapore, Vietnam, Brunei, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, and Peru will: declare dangerous drugs to be safe. Together. On behalf of the corporations who manufacture them.
When a massive global agency, like the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), is actually a criminal organization, it enjoys special benefits, not the least of which is freedom from prosecution.
Now you’re talking about real power. Now you’re talking about the Wild West, in terms of the license to commit crimes.
Except, with such agencies, it all looks very organized, very legitimate, very sober, very corporate. The crazy outlaws wear suits and cut their hair. They carry briefcases and write reports. They don’t chew tobacco and spit the juice on the street. They don’t stagger out of saloons and fire their guns in the air.
They have workable relationships with the press. They’re faceless. They gnaw away at populations from the inside.
Among other corporate benefits, the TPP will allow pharmaceutical companies to extend the life of patents on drugs. And those drugs will be exported and imported, from country to country, with far less oversight re their destructive health effects, because, in phase one, drug companies will be able to sue governments, in private tribunals, for ‘restraint of free trade,’ when the specter of drug-dangers is raised and drug-imports are refused and turned away.

This post was published at Jon Rappoport on May 31, 2015.

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