Spot The Odd One Out: ‘War On Drugs’ Edition

USA, USA, USA!!!
As we noted previously, the over-criminalization of America is a relatively recent trend. As Holly Harris notes:
It wasn’t always like this. In 1972, for every 100,000 U. S. residents, 161 were incarcerated. By 2015, that rate had more than quadrupled, with nearly 670 out of every 100,000 Americans behind bars.
The over-criminalization of America is rooted in federal laws and regulations, and state and local governments have followed suite. here is Harris’s account:
The burgeoning U. S. prison population reflects a federal criminal code that has spiraled out of control. No one – not even the government itself – has ever been able to specify with any certainty the precise number of federal crimes defined by the 54 sections contained in the 27,000 or so pages of the U. S. Code. In the 1980s, lawyers at the Department of Justice attempted to tabulate the figure ‘for the express purpose of exposing the idiocy’ of the criminal code, as one of them later put it. The best they were able to come up with was an educated guess of 3,000 crimes. Today, the conservative Heritage Foundation estimates that federal laws currently enumerate nearly 5,000 crimes, a number that grows every year.
Overcriminalization extends beyond the law books, partly because regulations are often backed by criminal penalties. That is the case for rules that govern matters as trivial as the sale of grated cheese, the precise composition of chicken Kiev dishes, and the washing of cars at the headquarters of the National Institutes of Health. State laws add tens of thousands more such crimes. Taken together, they push the total number of criminally punishable offenses in the United States into the hundreds of thousands. The long arm of the law reaches into nearly every aspect of American life. The legal scholar Harvey Silverglate has concluded that the typical American commits at least three federal felonies a day, simply by going through his or her normal routine.

This post was published at Zero Hedge on Oct 19, 2017.

 

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