Americans And Jeff Sessions Want ‘Open Season’ on Cops

No, this is not a call to do any such thing.
It is a recognition that this is exactly what is going to happen if there are not major changes made in public policy, right ****ing now, and the only way those will happen is if the people of this nation stand up and demand them, enforcing that demand with whatever actions are both necessary and possible.
Just the other day:
A 25-year-old California man was arrested in connection to an online quarrel between two ‘Call of Duty’ gamers that prompted a hoax call and led to a man being killed by police in Kansas.
Los Angeles police on Friday arrested Tyler Barriss, who law enforcement claimed is the ‘prankster’ who called 911 and made up a story about a kidnapping in Wichita, ABC 7 reported.
Barriss reportedly gave police the address he believed the other gamer lived.
In the audio of the 911 call, the caller claimed his father had been shot in the head and that he was holding his mother and a sibling at gunpoint. The caller added that he poured gasoline inside the home and “might just set it on fire.”
Now let’s put context on this.

This post was published at Market-Ticker on 2017-12-30.

US State Department Hints At Iran Overthrow: Are We Witnessing The Early Stages Of Regime Change?

The US State Department has issued a formal condemnation of the Iranian government following two days of economic protests centering in a handful of cities, calling the regime “a rogue state whose chief exports are violence, bloodshed, and chaos” while announcing support for protesters. It fits a familiar script which seems to roll out when anyone protests for any reason in a country considered an enemy of the United States (whether over economic grievances or full on calling for government overthrow).

This post was published at Zero Hedge on 12/30/2017 –.

FIRED FOR EXPOSING SANDY HOOK ‘MASSACRE’: PROFESSOR JAMES TRACY DENIED FIRST AMENDMENT RIGHTS BY FEDERAL COURT

The Death of Academic Freedom
On December 11, 2017, in a serious miscarriage of justice, a jury in West Palm Beach, Florida, ruled unanimously in favor of Florida Atlantic University and against former Media Studies Professor James Tracy, who was suing for reinstatement after his firing in 2016.
The jury found that Tracy’s ‘controversial’ articles on Memory Hole Blog were not a ‘motivating factor’ in his firing, the only question they were required to consider. Of course, Tracy’s posts at ‘his conspiracy theory blog’ were indeed the reason he was fired, but the jury was convinced otherwise by FAU’s legal team with assistance from the judge.
The case centered around Tracy’s writings on the anomalies found in the reporting on the Sandy Hook ‘massacre’ of December 14, 2012. His skepticism about the event was not to the liking of the university.
FAU maintained that Tracy was not fired from his tenured position because of his blog posts, but because he did not follow the ‘rules’ set out by ‘his bosses’ at the government-run institution. FAU attorney G. Joseph Curley insisted that Tracy was not denied his First Amendment rights, but that he simply did not follow university procedure.
‘Professor Tracy doesn’t follow the rules,’ Curley told the jury. ‘They’re rules that everyone else follows. He doesn’t play by the rules.’ FAU cast the case as one of a ‘belligerent,’ rebellious,’ and ‘nonconformist’ employee being let go for ‘insubordination,’ instead of that of a tenured professor exercising his right to free speech.[1]
FAU’s current ‘rules’ require that faculty submit forms listing ‘outside activities’ to be vetted for administrative approval, whether the activities are compensated or not. Tracy and other professors at FAU had argued that the policy is vague and confusing, constituting a form of prior restraint forbidden by the First Amendment, and leading to a climate of ‘fear and uncertainty’ among the faculty.
Aside from the fact that ‘outside activities’ can reach into all aspects of a professor’s life and therefore be difficult if not impossible to list, such activities must not be subject to bureaucratic approval. And certainly, no tenured professor can be fired for not filling out a form, even at Florida Atlantic University.[2]

This post was published at The Daily Sheeple on DECEMBER 27, 2017.

Anarchy in the U.S.A.

Riots are unruly acts of civil unrest caused by an assembled group that result in violence against people and property.
Some riots start with an organized call to assemble that suddenly turns disorderly for any number of reasons. Some riots stem from a seemingly spontaneous outpouring of people onto the streets, though there are often signs of potential trouble for some time before it boils over into violence.
Once an organized march, for example, transforms into a violent and uncontrollable mob, another dynamic takes over. This is referred to as ‘herd mentality.’ A mob creates its own whirlpool and rapidly draws others into acting aggressive, rebellious or destructive.
Negative behavior is highly contagious. One person throws a garbage can through a plate glass window and it’s like dropping a match into a crate of ammunition: The situation explodes, others follow suit and a riot is born. There are no rules in a riot – it’s an example of humanity without laws when robbery, assault and manslaughter are committed openly.
Head up, Eyes Open
As I mentioned, civil unrest does not spring up overnight. In the age of instantaneous news coverage, topics that could cause massive civil disobedience are widely broadcast. Be alert to social issues that are creating a ripple of controversy in your community, especially ones that seem to stir up strong emotions. Don’t ignore bad news.
Although you may think it less stressful to focus on the latest happenings among celebrities or spend your time chatting electronically with friends, survival in the modern world requires a measure of due diligence.

This post was published at Laissez Faire on Dec 27, 2017.

“Wealth Effect” = Widening Wealth Inequality

Note that widening wealth and income inequality is a non-partisan trend. One of the core goals of the Federal Reserve’s monetary policies of the past 9 years is to generate the “wealth effect”: by pushing the valuations of stocks and bonds higher, American households will feel wealthier, and hence be more willing to borrow and spend, even if they didn’t actually reap any gains by selling stocks and bonds that gained value. In other words, the mere perception of rising wealth is supposed to trigger a wave of renewed borrowing and spending. This perception management only worked on the few households which owned enough of these assets to feel wealthier–the top 5%, the top 6 million out of 120 million households. This chart shows what happened as the Fed ceaselessly goosed financial assets higher over the past 9 years: the gains, real and perceived, only flowed to the top 5% of households earning in excess of $200,000 annually. Spending by the bottom 95% has at best returned to the levels reached a decade ago in 2007.

This post was published at Charles Hugh Smith on TUESDAY, DECEMBER 26, 2017.