Did Awans Cut A Deal? January Court Date Mysteriously Disappears From Docket

Luke Rosiak of The Daily Caller pointed out a mysterious twist in the case of Pakistani national and long-time DNC IT contractor, Imran Awan – who was arrested in July at Dulles Airport while trying to flee the country after having wired nearly $300,000 to Pakistan.
Awan’s court date on four counts related to bank fraud, which had already been reschedule twice, has disappeared from the docket altogether:
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Which begs the question – did Imran Awan cut a deal with Federal prosecutors?
Of note – Imran’s wife, Hina Alvi – who had fled to Pakistan in March with the Awan children, struck a deal with federal prosecutors in September to return to the U. S. and face charges. One wonders why Alvi would willingly leave the relative security of her family in Pakistan to face arraignment in the United States?
To briefly recap, our report from last week, the Awan family – which was employed by quite a number of House Democrats, had full access to highly sensitive Congressional computer systems, both on-site and remotely from Pakistan, with which they are suspected of committing a variety of crimes – including brokering classified information to hostile foreign governments.

This post was published at Zero Hedge on Thu, 12/28/2017.

26/12/17: U.S. Wars Budgets: More Lessons Never Learned

An interesting report on the official accounts for war-related spending in the U. S. is available here: Which is, of course, a massive under-estimate of the full cost of 2001-2017 wars to the U. S. taxpayers.
It is worth remembering that war-related expenditures are outside discretionary budgetary allocations (follow links here: And you can read more here: The problem, as I repeatedly pointed out, is that no one can tell us what exactly – aside from misery, failed states, collapsed economies, piles of dead bodies etc – did these expenditures achieve, or for that matter what did all the adventurous entanglements the U. S. got into in recent year deliver? In Afghanistan, Libya, Yemen and Syria, in Pakistan and Sudan, in Ukraine, in Somalia and Egypt. The sole bright spot on the U. S. ‘policy horizon’ is Kurdistan. But the problem is, the U. S. has been quietly undermining its main ally in the Syria-Iraq-Turkey sub-region in recent years. In South China Seas, Beijing is fully running the show, as multi-billion U. S. hardware bobbles up and down the waves to no effect. In North Korea, a villain with a bucket of uranium is in charge, and Iran is standing strong. In its historical backyard of Latin America, the U. S. is now confronting growing Chinese influence, while losing allies.

This post was published at True Economics on Tuesday, December 26, 2017.