Why CIA’s Richard Helms Lied About Oswald: Part 3

This is a rumination on lies – layer upon layer of lies – told by US intelligence agencies and other officials about what Lee Harvey Oswald, or someone pretending to be him, was allegedly doing in Mexico City just weeks before the Kennedy assassination. The original goal, it seems, was to associate Oswald, in advance of the events of Dealey Plaza, with the USSR and Cuba.
The essay focuses on tales told by Richard Helms, a top official of the CIA in 1963 who later became its director – and is based on a talk given by Peter Dale Scott.
Scott is the popularizer of the expression, ‘Deep Politics,’ and a virtuoso when it comes to what sometimes seems like grabbing smoke – capturing proof, however elusive, of motives and objectives that could explain the machinations of US intelligence agencies – and then analyzing the residue.
Not all of the chicanery Scott describes is subtle. For example, in an apparent attempt to bring the Russians into the picture, someone delivered to the FBI’s Dallas office a purported audiotape of Oswald calling the Soviet embassy in Mexico City. That failed, though, when FBI agents decided that the voice did not seem to be Oswald’s.
Then, two days later, the FBI joined the subterfuge by falsely reporting that ‘no tapes were taken to Dallas.’ Because of this lie, an investigation more than a decade later by the House Select Committee on Assassinations would erroneously declare that there was no ‘basis for concluding that there had been an Oswald imposter.’ (The existence of an Oswald impersonator in the months before the president’s murder would in and of itself have been prima facie evidence of a conspiracy in Kennedy’s death.)
And then there was the attempt to set up a Soviet agent…

This post was published at Lew Rockwell on January 1, 2016.

Why CIA’s Richard Helms Lied About Oswald: Part 2

This is a rumination on lies – layer upon layer of lies – told by US intelligence agencies and other officials about what Lee Harvey Oswald, or someone pretending to be him, was allegedly doing in Mexico City just weeks before the Kennedy assassination. The original goal, it seems, was to associate Oswald, in advance of the events of Dealey Plaza, with the USSR and Cuba.
The essay focuses on tales told by Richard Helms, a top official of the CIA in 1963 who later became its director – and is based on a talk given by Peter Dale Scott.
Scott is the popularizer of the expression, ‘Deep Politics,’ and a virtuoso when it comes to what sometimes seems like grabbing smoke – capturing proof, however elusive, of motives and objectives that could explain the machinations of US intelligence agencies – and then analyzing the residue.
Not all of the chicanery Scott describes is subtle. For example, in an apparent attempt to bring the Russians into the picture, someone delivered to the FBI’s Dallas office a purported audiotape of Oswald calling the Soviet embassy in Mexico City. That failed, though, when FBI agents decided that the voice did not seem to be Oswald’s.
Then, two days later, the FBI got on board the subterfuge by falsely reporting that ‘no tapes were taken to Dallas.’ Because of this lie, an investigation more than a decade later by the House Select Committee on Assassinations would erroneously declare that there was no ‘basis for concluding that there had been an Oswald imposter.’ (The existence of an Oswald impersonator in the months before the president’s murder would in and of itself have been prima facie evidence of a conspiracy in Kennedy’s death.)
And then there was the attempt to set up a Soviet agent…

This post was published at Lew Rockwell on Who.What.Why. / December 31, 2015.

Why CIA’s Richard Helms Lied About Oswald: Part 1

This is a rumination on lies – layer upon layer of lies – told by US intelligence agencies and other officials about what Lee Harvey Oswald, or someone pretending to be him, was allegedly doing in Mexico City just weeks before the Kennedy assassination. The original goal, it seems, was to associate Oswald, in advance of the events of Dealey Plaza, with the USSR and Cuba.
The essay focuses on tales told by Richard Helms, a top official of the CIA in 1963 who later became its director – and is based on a talk given by Peter Dale Scott.
Scott is the popularizer of the expression, ‘Deep Politics,’ and a virtuoso when it comes to what sometimes seems like grabbing smoke – capturing proof, however elusive, of motives and objectives that could explain the machinations of US intelligence agencies – and then analyzing the residue.
Not all of the chicanery Scott describes is subtle. For example, in an apparent attempt to bring the Russians into the picture, someone delivered to the FBI’s Dallas office a purported audiotape of Oswald calling the Soviet embassy in Mexico City. That failed, though, when FBI agents decided that the voice did not seem to be Oswald’s.
Then, two days later, the FBI got on board the subterfuge by falsely reporting that ‘no tapes were taken to Dallas.’ Because of this lie, an investigation more than a decade later by the House Select Committee on Assassinations would erroneously declare that there was no ‘basis for concluding that there had been an Oswald impostor.’ (The existence of an Oswald impersonator in the months before the president’s murder would in and of itself have been prima facie evidence of a conspiracy in Kennedy’s death.)
And then there was the attempt to set up a Soviet agent…

This post was published at Lew Rockwell on Who.What.Why. / December 29, 2015.

CIA mind-control program: did it really end?

Follow me on a few twists and turns down the rabbit hole.
Start with this untitled June 27, 1994, document, stored at the National Security Archive at The George Washington University.
It was written by a CIA advisory committee, and forwarded to the Presidential Committee on Human Radiation Experiments, which was preparing public hearings in 1994.
Here is a key quote:
‘In the 1950s and 60s, the CIA engaged in an extensive program of human experimentation [MKULTRA], using drugs, psychological, and other means, in search of techniques to control human behavior for counterintelligence and covert action purposes… Most of the MKULTRA records were deliberately destroyed in 1973 by the order of then DCI Richard Helms… Helms testified that he agreed to destroy the records because ‘there had been relationships with outsiders in government agencies and other organizations and that these would be sensitive in this kind of a thing but that since the [mind-control] program was over and finished and done with, we thought we would just get rid of files as well, so that anybody who assisted us in the past would not be subject to follow-up questions, embarrassment, if you will.”
Helms was not only admitting he destroyed the records, he was stating that the MKULTRA program deployed, through contracts, ‘outsiders’ to carry out mind control experiments. He was determined to protect the outsiders, to keep their identity and work secret. He was also dedicated to preventing these people from exposing the nature of their mind-control work.
Subsequently, some of these ‘outsiders’ have been revealed. But no one really knows how deep, far, and wide the CIA penetrated into academic and research communities to enable MKULTRA.
Helms also stated that MKULTRA was ended. There is no reason to believe this. Therefore, his justification for destroying huge numbers of documents was absurd.

This post was published at Jon Rappoport on January 9, 2014.

New Book- CIA Plotted to Assassinate Nixon Over Vietnam Troop Withdrawals, Detente

Senator Howard Baker learned Agency Infiltrated and sabotaged the Watergate Break-in
Roger Stone, former Advisor to Richard Nixon and New York Times bestselling author of The Man Who Killed Kennedy – now says the same forces who killed JFK tried twice to assassinate President Richard Nixon for the same reason, Vietnam and their bitter opposition to detente.
A Washington Insider for forty years, Stone’s sweeping new book Nixon’s Secrets traced the ark of the career of the 37th President, Richard Milhous Nixon, the most brilliant, sad, bold, awkward, disciplined, insecure, proud and visionary man to ever serve as President.
Stone claims the CIA tried to kill Nixon twice in Miami in 1972. Nixon further inflamed the CIA for demanding their records on the Bay Of Pigs and the JFK assassination. ‘CIA Director Richard Helms and Nixon had so much on each other that neither could breathe’ says Sen Howard Baker in Stones’s book. When Baker asked Nixon who really killed JFK, Nixon barked ‘you don’t want to know’ according to CBS producer Don Hewitt.
The author who proved LBJ, the CIA, the Mob and wealthy right-wing Texas Oilmen plotted to kill John Kennedy in his first book The Man Who Killed Kennedy – the Case Against LBJ now says ‘The CIA, the JOINT CHIEFS, NSC all opposed Nixon’s rapid draw-down of troops from Vietnam, his arms control agreement with the USSR and the opening to China’ said Stone. ‘They thought Nixon would be the ultimate hard-line anticommunist and were shocked by his pro-peace foreign policies.’ Stone told the UK Daily Mail.
Stone says a military spy ring started spying on Nixon as early as 1969- with a Navy courier copying documents from burn bags, desks, files and even Henry Kissinger’s brief case and send the material to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs Admiral Thomas Moorer says Stone and co-author Mike Colapietro, a veteran investigative Journalist.

This post was published at Lew Rockwell on August 27, 2014.